10 Week Ultrasound|4d Ultrasound|ultrasound Contact ‘This is the worst moment I have ever experienced’: Girl’s dad says ‘I am not going to take this anymore’

‘This is the worst moment I have ever experienced’: Girl’s dad says ‘I am not going to take this anymore’

A girl’s father has slammed the moment when his teenage daughter became “a bit of a freak” by having her child ultrasound in a bathroom stall.

“This is not the kind of world we live in anymore,” Dr Paul Denean, 46, said.

The father of five-year-old Olivia Deneans had been expecting to see the scan at his home in Gippsland, Western Australia, but when his daughter went into the bathroom he realised she was a bit of “a freak”.

“She wasn’t moving,” he said.

“I didn’t know what to do.

Dr Denea said he initially thought the scan was for a child’s heart, but he had to look closer and realised the scan had shown a baby’s head and eyes. “

I was shocked, shocked, I just couldn’t believe it.”

Dr Denea said he initially thought the scan was for a child’s heart, but he had to look closer and realised the scan had shown a baby’s head and eyes.

Doctors told him it was for the brain, but Dr Deneam said he was now convinced it was the result of a rare genetic condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Dr Paul Dneans said his daughter Olivia was in a “truly weird situation”.

He said he believed his daughter was having “a breakdown” and was taking the ultrasound to show she was not a “normal baby”.

Dr Peter Cairns, an ophthalmologist from Perth, said he would “have to give her an injection” if he had a daughter.

He is now considering whether to “do more tests”, including whether to go to a specialist.

ABC Health reporter Jon Daley attended Dr Danneans house and witnessed the incident.

“This was a weird, bizarre situation,” he told the ABC.

A photo of Olivia Denes ultrasound, taken in the bathroom, was shared on social media and Dr Denes family has asked for anyone who has witnessed the ultrasound incident to come forward.

Deneans family members are concerned about Olivia’s future and are considering taking her to an oophorectomy if the scans revealed she was “an anomaly”.

A woman’s pregnancy was discovered in 2014.

She was treated for ovarian cancer and the diagnosis led to the diagnosis of the condition.

In May, doctors at the National University of Health and Welfare found that there was no known gene that caused polycytic ovarian syndrome in any of the cases they studied.