10 Week Ultrasound|4d Ultrasound|ultrasound Understanding ‘I’m really scared’: Woman tells how her first ultrasound was performed

‘I’m really scared’: Woman tells how her first ultrasound was performed

Posted October 14, 2018 04:16:11 A woman in Saskatchewan, Canada, says she was shocked to find out her first two-hour ultrasound was done on a portable ultrasound machine, which she says is unsafe.

She told CBC News that the technician asked for a full scan and she was given an “incomplete” scan.

The technician told her that her ultrasound was going to be done at a private facility, which the woman said didn’t sound right.

She said she felt violated and that she felt unsafe because she didn’t know the person responsible for the work.

“It was just horrible,” said the woman, who asked not to be named.

“I’m actually really scared.”

The woman, a nurse practitioner, said she was going through the same procedure at a local clinic when she found out about the incident.

The woman has since filed a complaint with the Health Department and a complaint has been filed with the Federal Government, but the woman did not receive any official guidance or information about the procedures.

In the CBC report, the woman describes the experience as “extremely uncomfortable,” and says she has experienced other problems in the past when using ultrasound machines.

The Canadian Medical Association has not yet commented on the matter.

“This is an incredibly dangerous process and it’s just not right that you can’t just get a full image and see if there are any abnormalities,” said Dr. Anne Moller, the group’s medical director.

Moller said the practice of using portable ultrasound machines is common in rural parts of Canada. “

We want to know that what’s going on in the head of a child is not the result of some sort of illness, that we’re not going to have a brain tumor.”

Moller said the practice of using portable ultrasound machines is common in rural parts of Canada.

In Alberta, the government recently began requiring all doctors to wear medical masks during elective ultrasound procedures.

Health Canada also says there is no medical justification for performing a full ultrasound without a doctor present.

The province is currently considering legislation that would require doctors to have their license renewed every five years.

The bill is expected to be introduced by the legislature later this month.

“A lot of us have experienced a lot of issues over the years,” said Moller.

“As we grow, we have to make sure we are providing information and services that are accurate and relevant to the population we serve.”

A spokesperson for Health Canada said the agency does not comment on individual cases.